Allied soldiers binding up the wounds of their prisoners after the battle


Title

Allied soldiers binding up the wounds of their prisoners after the battle

Description

Human suffering breaks down many barriers. Here we see the French "fraternizing with the enemy." Fritz and Hans are receiving the same Frenche and impartial treatment that would be given to the wounded of their own ranks. No prisoners of war were ever more considerately and humanely treated than were the German prisoners in France and England. They were well housed, clothed and fed ; and were given such medical attention as their wounds or diseases required. Operative surgery made great advance during the World War. Opportunity for experimentation was unlimited! The treatment of wounds of the knee-joint is a conspicuous example. Infection of this joint, the largest and most complex in the body, has been one of the most dreaded in surgery. It resulted at the best, in a stiff and useless joint, often amputation and not rarely death. Not so any more. In this war most cases were healed and from half to two-thirds of the cases recovered with full or partial use of the joint movement. Perhaps the greatest permanent advance in surgery was made in the repair of shattered faces. Almost unbelievable miracles were performed. Gaps in the jaws were filled by bone transplanted from other parts, skin was borrowed from parts that could spare it and used to cover up scars ; cheeks were filled in, noses built up and lips replaced, and all fitted and moulded with the nicety of a cabinet maker or a potter.

Medium

Extent

1 stereograph : b&w
1 gelatine silver print stereograph (8 x 15 cm) mounted on card (9 x 18 cm)

Rights

Copyright. The Keystone View Company
No known restrictions on publication

Relation

World War through the stereoscope

Download File(s)

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-012.jpg
https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-012b.jpg

Citation

Keystone View Company, “Allied soldiers binding up the wounds of their prisoners after the battle,” Monash Collections Online, accessed September 26, 2020, http://repository.monash.edu/items/show/25416

Item Relations

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