Stereoscopic images of the Russo-Japanese War

Title

Stereoscopic images of the Russo-Japanese War

Identifier

http://hdl.handle.net/1959.1/682439

Description

This collection comprises a selection of stereoscopic images of the Russo-Japanese War produced by the Ingersoll View Company, held in the Monash University Library Rare Books Collection. With original photographs by Richard Barry, the set shows the Japanese army in the Port Arthur (now Lüshun) area, a port occupied by the Russians and beseiged by the Japanese during the war. Views include soldiers transporting a mortar shell; “Osaka Babies” (Japanese guns); a solider getting a haircut; soldiers in their camp; a boiled water cart, which transported sterile drinking water for soldiers; Japanese officers, including General Oshima, Major Yamaguchi, and Major Oda; also, photographer, Richard Barry and war artist Frederic Villiers.

Items in the Stereoscopic images of the Russo-Japanese War

'permalink')); ?>
Superstitious Chinese children covering their faces to avoid being photographed
In the Chinese Village there were nine little Chinese children who were shrewdly employed at the entrance to the concession as a drawing feature and who attracted great crowds of people. The youngest child was but three years old. Both parents lived…

'permalink')); ?>
Gathering fuel in the Manchurian corn fields
The scarcity of fuel in Manchuria was one of the problems which caused a great deal of trouble to the Japanese army. Our picture shows a number of Manchurian peasants pulling up corn stalks by the roots and loading them on a wagon, to sell to the…

'permalink')); ?>
Frederick villiers, the greatest of living war artists
This is an excellent portrait of the war artist, Frederick Villiers, with his Chinese servant, taken in front of his house in Dalny. Frederick Villiers is well known to the civilized world as the dean of war correspondents, the hero of Plevna and the…

'permalink')); ?>
Group of the famous "Black Watch of Japan"
This is a splendid, life-like picture of a group of soldiers from the famous Ninth Regiment of Japan, known as the "Black Watch." The regiment lost ninety per cent of its men in the furious assault in August, 1904, on the fortress of the Eternal…

'permalink')); ?>
Gunner carrying powder to one of the "Osaka Babies"
This picture shows a gunner carrying powder to one of the eighteen eleven-inch mortars, which did so much toward reducing Port Arthur. The gunner is hurrying from the bomb-proof magazine to the gun, carrying on his back in a cannister the charge of…

'permalink')); ?>
Mr Richard Barry in Manchuria
When it had become evident that the taking of Port Arthur would be a longer task than any of the Japanese had calculated upon, when the Japanese chief-commander before Port Arthur had resigned himself to the conviction that General Stoessel would…

'permalink')); ?>
Frederick villiers teaching the Japs how to handle a fractious horse
The island of Japan, the home of the Jinrikishaw and the?as conveyances for persons of rank or wealth, have new horses, and the Japs know little or nothing of horses. When the war with Russia [became] inevitable, they bought up a large number of…

'permalink')); ?>
A convalescent's letter home
This picture was taken in the Russian Cathedral in Dalny, which was used by the Japanese, after they had captured the city, as an officers' hospital. The officer is writing a letter to his dear ones in Japan. What is he writing about? Let us peep…

'permalink')); ?>
Guard mount of Gen. Oshima's private guard
To be chosen a member of General Oshima's or General Nogi's body-guard was a great honor. Everyone of them had distinguished himself in the front and was rewarded for his exemplary bravery and dutifulness by an appointment to the private guard. About…

'permalink')); ?>
A Japanese trench guard at mess
After the Japanese had learned that Port Arthur could not be taken by a furious assault that lasted seven days and cost them 25,000 precious lives, they settled down to do in six months or a year, what they had come to do. They began a vast system of…

'permalink')); ?>
In Manchurian winter costume
This picture shows [two Manchurian]?returning from the Japanese commissary in front of Port Arthur, where they have?to dispose of their poultry. The coolies are wearing the thick native jackets, padded two inches [thick with] wool [which] is…

'permalink')); ?>
Tickling the Earthwith a stick for a plow
The Manchurian plow consists of a sharp crooked stick, firmly clamped or tied to a beam drawn by a pair of donkeys or oxen. The plowman guides the plow by a single handle and his work is of the most fatiguing kind. He cannot also guide the team, so…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese army reserves arriving in Manchuria
This picture was taken in Fukishimachi, Manchuria, and represents a number of Japanese reserves who had just landed and were on their way to the front to replace the thousands of their comrades who, under the command of Oyama, Kuroki and Nodzu, were…

'permalink')); ?>
Wounded soldiers on their way to hospitals at Dalny
These men were some of the lightly wounded of the fight of October 29, 1904, and were photographed by Mr. Barry the day after, as they were on their way through a Chinese village to Dalny, where they would receive proper medical and surgical…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese bomb-proof burrow
This is one of the bomb-proofs which the Japanese dug and in which they lived during the siege of Port Arthur, their only protection from the cold and from the Russian shells and bullets. The bomb-proofs were dug into hillsides and protected around…

'permalink')); ?>
An extemporized operating room in the Japanese camp
The surgical service in the Japanese Army was above all praise. Mr. Barry witnessed many difficult, successful operations, undertaken while the battle was raging, right in the rear of the firing line. One day a soldier was brought on a stretcher who…

'permalink')); ?>
A group of Japanese army telegraphers
The telegraph played a very important part in the siege of Port Arthur. Not only was the headquarters of the commander-in-chief connected with every part of the long line of the besieging forces that extended fifteen miles around Port Arthur, but as…

'permalink')); ?>
A native Chinese transport
The Manchurians made money during the war. During the first three months the Russians were in the land, and when fighting began the Manchurians were employed to carry Russian wounded into Port Arthur and to bury Russian dead by the roadside for fifty…

'permalink')); ?>
Loading an "Osaka Baby"
Eighteen of these immense mortars, originally built for defending the coasts of Japan, were brought into position before Port Arthur. They were brought by sea to Dalny, carried by railroad a distance of fifteen miles to the end of the track, and from…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese transports on the shell strewn road
This picture was taken on the road from Dalny to Port Arthur, about two and a half miles from the latter place, therefore within easy range of the big Russian guns. There was a railroad there which the Japanese might have used for transporting…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese troops in the front parallel
This trench was less than one hundred feet from the sheer granite walls of Keekwan (Cock's Comb) fort. The picture was taken at the moment when the soldiers prepared for the final assault on October 29th, in which they succeeded in driving the…

'permalink')); ?>
Lieut. Gen. Oshima, Japan's fighting general
This picture of Japan's "fighting general," Oshima, was taken at the entrance to the hut which he used for headquarters and from where he commanded the Central Division of the Third Corps of the Japanese Army in front of Port Arthur. In this little…

'permalink')); ?>
Richard Barry and his Chinese boy
During the long months in which the Japanese first attempted to take Port Arthur by assault, and when they had found out, at a cost of 25,000 valuable lives, that the Russians were a different foe from the Chinese, settled down to a regular siege…

'permalink')); ?>
A group of Japanese students
In the rear of the Japanese firing line there was much work to be done, work for which trained soldiers were not necessary, the work of coolies. There were, for instance, the eighteen eleven-inch mortars, with their enormous gun-carriages, to be…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese officersand war artists at Gen. Nogi's door
This is a picture of Major Yamaguchi, Richard Barry and Major Oda, General Nogi's confidential messenger. The picture was taken at the entrance of General Nogi's headquarters during the fall of 1904, while the siege of Port Arthur was in progress.…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese army reserves leaving Dalny for Port Arthur
Port Arthur was taken at a fearful cost. Thousands of the brave little Japs were sacrificed that a few surviving ones might succeed in scaling the parapet of a Russian fort. Hundreds fell at every few yards' approach nearer to the enemy, but fifty…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese army press censors
In this picture the officer on the left is Major Yamaoka and the one at the right is Major Yamaguchi, both on General Nogi's staff. These two were the press censors. Every word of news that left the Japanese headquarters was controlled by them. The…

'permalink')); ?>
Major Yamaoka and staff officers
Major Yamaoka, on General Nogi's staff, spent three years in the United States and studied at Wabash College, in Indiana. This explains his American appearance. He looks as if he had stepped out of an American fashion plate. He speaks English, French…

'permalink')); ?>
Japanese officer looking into Port Arthur
Port Arthur was considered impregnable, and the fact that General Stoessel surrendered does not disprove the proposition. If Stoessel's soldiers had been Japanese, well ammunitioned, well provisioned and ably commanded, the outcome would have been…

'permalink')); ?>
Manchurian small boy orphans
These two Manchurian boys, photographed near Port Arthur, were driven from their home by a Russian shell that killed their father and mother. The made a living by tramping from one Japanese camp to another selling eggs. Behind the taller one of the…